Sermons & Seminars

Last week I told a humorous story from Bob Fulghum.  It’s good to have a smile.  Here’s another: The most time-bound man I know lives in my neighbourhood.  He’s always in a hurry – and always late.  Always harassed and fuzzed out.  I’m not exactly...
Glynn Cardy
It’s always good to have some fun on Father’s Day.  Even in church. So here’s a fun story about dads and daughters from that master storyteller Bob Fulghum: “Grand Junction, Colorado.  Hot afternoon in mid-July.  Local newspaper headline says: ‘...
Glynn Cardy
There are different kinds of fear.  There is the fear of having once committed an act of murder and now afraid of being caught by one’s conscience or the authorities.  That’s the fear Moses had.  He was hiding out in Midian.  Shutting off his former...
Glynn Cardy Exodus 3:1-15, Matthew 20: 20-28
                                                                                                                    The passages in Matthew and Romans in today’s lectionary readings are very well known and loved. We have Peter’s confession of who...
Allan Jones Matthew 16:13 – 20. Romans 12: 1 – 8
The Gospel reading today is about eating and excreting, belonging and borders.  It uses the metaphor of the household table to describe not just a religion but a geographical region.  Who can gather at the table, the church, or country, and partake...
Glynn Cardy Matthew 15:10-28
Today is Peace Sunday in our church calendar and we will begin with a meditation from the Buddhist tradition calling us into our connectedness with the cosmos, with the earth and each other, and within ourselves.   Meditation The bell is an...
Glynn Cardy
For the past two Sundays I have been preaching on parables that were most likely told by Jesus.  On July 19th I spoke about the parables of the mustard weed and the unclean bread pointing to the Jesus vision of normative barriers like religious...
Glynn Cardy Matthew 18:21-35
One of the tell-tale signs that a parable probably originates with Jesus of Nazareth is its subversion of myth.  I grew up in a culture that had a low view of myth (also known as ‘make-believe’) and a high view of history (also known as ‘facts’). ...
Glynn Cardy
Jesus dreamed of an upside-down world, which he called the empire[i] of god, where the normal ways of thinking and operating – ways steeped in hierarchies and the violence that undergirded them - were overturned.  This upside-down world was...
Glynn Cardy
The Parable of the Sower tells of a farmer, like in Van Gogh’s painting, throwing out seed upon the ground.  It’s a typical agrarian image that endures.  The parable and its interpretations offered by the gospel editors Mark, Matthew, and Luke, are...
Glynn Cardy
Romans 7:13-25 Matthew 11: 16-20; 25-30a                       What awkward, contrary creatures we humans are! No wonder Jesus ‘voice’ in the reading from Matthew this morning sounds a tad annoyed! The writings suggest that the ordinary people as...
Susan Adams
Tena koutou te whanau… Today we celebrate Matariki – the end of one year and the beginning of another.  It is traditional to begin Matariki by honouring our dead.  E nga mate, haere, haere, haere ki te po.  [To our dead farewell, farewell, farewell...
Glynn Cardy
The readings today from Genesis 21 (8-21) and Matthew 10 (34-39) can be read as reflections on ‘home’. As I said last Sunday, Ishmael and his mother Hagar were unjustly cast out of their home - home being the tents of the patriarch Abraham.  Hagar...
Glynn Cardy
The text for today from Matthew’s gospel (9:35 – 10:1) of Jesus, motivated by compassion, sending out disciples to have authority over and cast out demons and to cure every disease, comes from the late 1st century and indicates how, in the decades...
Glynn Cardy
Trinity Sunday is a time to contemplate God together, to try to find some language to express such contemplation, and to try to find hints as to how a contemplative community (like a church) might aid in healing the world.   Not that this is how...
Glynn Cardy
When reading a passage from the New Testament that includes extraordinary phenomena – like in the Luke-Acts account of Jesus ascending up into the heavens (which we heard read last week) and the day of Pentecost (rushing wind, tongues of fire, and...
Glynn Cardy
The Ascension never happened.  It was not an historical event.  If a tourist with an iPhone had been present at Bethany they would have recorded absolutely nothing.  Jesus ‘going into God’ has always been a theological statement.  The important...
Glynn Cardy
In these last six weeks, like others, I’ve been doing some tidying up and sorting.  When it comes to a book that involves familiarizing myself once again with the story and, if it’s a good one, re-reading it.  You can see why sorting takes me a...
Glynn Cardy
Mother’s Day is primarily about honouring mothers.  It is about appreciating that we were born and are alive.  It’s about appreciating that the circumstances of the time of our mothers’ lives were different from your own, and she was shaped by those...
Glynn Cardy
Today, the 3rd Sunday after Easter, the church calendar gives us “Good Shepherd Sunday”, which I usually duck.  I find the dominance of this metaphor difficult for three reasons: 
Glynn Cardy

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