Sermons & Seminars

Today is Peace Sunday in our church calendar and we will begin with a meditation from the Buddhist tradition calling us into our connectedness with the cosmos, with the earth and each other, and within ourselves.   Meditation The bell is an...
Glynn Cardy
For the past two Sundays I have been preaching on parables that were most likely told by Jesus.  On July 19th I spoke about the parables of the mustard weed and the unclean bread pointing to the Jesus vision of normative barriers like religious...
Glynn Cardy Matthew 18:21-35
One of the tell-tale signs that a parable probably originates with Jesus of Nazareth is its subversion of myth.  I grew up in a culture that had a low view of myth (also known as ‘make-believe’) and a high view of history (also known as ‘facts’). ...
Glynn Cardy
Jesus dreamed of an upside-down world, which he called the empire[i] of god, where the normal ways of thinking and operating – ways steeped in hierarchies and the violence that undergirded them - were overturned.  This upside-down world was...
Glynn Cardy
The Parable of the Sower tells of a farmer, like in Van Gogh’s painting, throwing out seed upon the ground.  It’s a typical agrarian image that endures.  The parable and its interpretations offered by the gospel editors Mark, Matthew, and Luke, are...
Glynn Cardy
Romans 7:13-25 Matthew 11: 16-20; 25-30a                       What awkward, contrary creatures we humans are! No wonder Jesus ‘voice’ in the reading from Matthew this morning sounds a tad annoyed! The writings suggest that the ordinary people as...
Susan Adams
Tena koutou te whanau… Today we celebrate Matariki – the end of one year and the beginning of another.  It is traditional to begin Matariki by honouring our dead.  E nga mate, haere, haere, haere ki te po.  [To our dead farewell, farewell, farewell...
Glynn Cardy
The readings today from Genesis 21 (8-21) and Matthew 10 (34-39) can be read as reflections on ‘home’. As I said last Sunday, Ishmael and his mother Hagar were unjustly cast out of their home - home being the tents of the patriarch Abraham.  Hagar...
Glynn Cardy
The text for today from Matthew’s gospel (9:35 – 10:1) of Jesus, motivated by compassion, sending out disciples to have authority over and cast out demons and to cure every disease, comes from the late 1st century and indicates how, in the decades...
Glynn Cardy
Trinity Sunday is a time to contemplate God together, to try to find some language to express such contemplation, and to try to find hints as to how a contemplative community (like a church) might aid in healing the world.   Not that this is how...
Glynn Cardy
When reading a passage from the New Testament that includes extraordinary phenomena – like in the Luke-Acts account of Jesus ascending up into the heavens (which we heard read last week) and the day of Pentecost (rushing wind, tongues of fire, and...
Glynn Cardy
The Ascension never happened.  It was not an historical event.  If a tourist with an iPhone had been present at Bethany they would have recorded absolutely nothing.  Jesus ‘going into God’ has always been a theological statement.  The important...
Glynn Cardy
In these last six weeks, like others, I’ve been doing some tidying up and sorting.  When it comes to a book that involves familiarizing myself once again with the story and, if it’s a good one, re-reading it.  You can see why sorting takes me a...
Glynn Cardy
Mother’s Day is primarily about honouring mothers.  It is about appreciating that we were born and are alive.  It’s about appreciating that the circumstances of the time of our mothers’ lives were different from your own, and she was shaped by those...
Glynn Cardy
Today, the 3rd Sunday after Easter, the church calendar gives us “Good Shepherd Sunday”, which I usually duck.  I find the dominance of this metaphor difficult for three reasons: 
Glynn Cardy
“Extraordinary”, “Unprecedented”; these are words that have been much used in relation to the times in which we live. Lockdown, social distancing, essential workers, bubbles, personal protective equipment, are some of the words that point to the new...
Allan Davidson
Thomas Aquinas, the renowned Medieval theologian, talked about each person having two possible resurrections.   Firstly, given the almost universal belief in the Middle Ages in the after-life, there was the post-death resurrection of a soul uniting...
Glynn Cardy
At Easter time Christians remember and re-enact our constructed narrative concerning the death of our leader, Jesus, and the death of his movement; and then the coming back to life of that movement, and Jesus’ spirit living on within it.  We re-...
Glynn Cardy
Good Friday remembers a time that wasn’t good.  It remembers the torture and execution of Jesus.  The passion accounts we have in the gospels of the New Testament are liturgical fiction based on the fact of Jesus’ death, like others’ deaths, on a...
Glynn Cardy
  Tradition begins with a story.  The story for the day ahead, Palm Sunday, is Jesus riding into Jerusalem on a donkey and the crowd waving palm branches and laying them on the ground for the donkey to walk upon.  In the drama of Jesus’ impending...
Glynn Cardy

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